Tag Archives: driving

No good story ever started with ________

31 Dec

blog image gilleys

“One time I was in Texas and….”

for my east coast friends this ends in either a fight in which beer, Mexican food and a woman is involved or with a police escort to the state line (sometimes both).  If you’re lucky, the fight happens at a place that requires patrons to check their guns upon entering.  While visiting The Lone Star State, you are free to carry all the concealed library cards you want.  Whether folks in Texas use library cards or read is unclear.

“I’m just going to pop into IKEA and…”

never come out.  Or at least never come out empty-handed.  Even if you buy only Svalka and Dryck Julmust (an auto-correct nightmare for sure), there’s no escaping the umlaut.  And if the meatballs don’t lure you in, the öersattlig napkins will.  In any case, there’s no “popping” into IKEA.  If you enter, you will spend both time and money buying items like weirdberry preserves that will sit on the kitchen shelf for a few years until one of you throws them away.  (PS: the shelf is a Fjalkinge and is ready for the trash alsö.)

“Why do you always…”

always what?  If I’m so busy constantly, eternally and perpetually doing whatever (kudos thesauras.com), how am I able to type (and online shop) right now?  Your question just went from defensive to expensive as you know that I can only deal with confrontation when sharply dressed.  Even my limited yoga and meditation practice has taught me that there are no absolutes.  Speaking of which, I positively must sign up for more Ashtanga classes.  And book a facial while I’m in town.  Definitely.

“Canadians have a word for this…”

well Canadians have a word for everything but can they drive?  Even my limited long-distance driving experience has taught me that Quebecers are the worst.  All summer, from New York State to the Jersey shore to the top of Maine, there they are either meandering in the left lane or zooming up all willy-nilly like in the right lane while loosely towing a pop up camper or some other clunky thing behind them and will then pull in front of you with only one working brakelight- like a little red eye winking as if to ask “how’s that affordable care act working out for ya?”  Meanwhile, The Boy (now eligible for his driving permit) is closely observing and asking questions like, “if the left foot works the clutch and the right foot works the other pedals, when am I supposed to shake it all about?”  We Americans have a word for Canadians and it’s not “Canadians.”

“Mom, no one wants to see you twerk.”

an actual sentence spoken by The Boy last week.  (He continued by saying that he felt weird even using the words “Mom” and “twerk” in a sentence but it had to be said.)

and finally,

“Haven’t we all had enough twerking?”

unless, of course, what we’re all really saying is “it’s 2014 already and time we all got back t’ werk.”  In which case, pass me my sledgehammer, I agree.

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Sure, you gain an hour, but at what cost?

7 Nov

blog image home alone 2

“And, really, what good is an hour when you have to come inside early because it’s dark out?” asked The Boy.  (Yes, he begins all his diatribes with “and” because he was raised in a very linguistically conscious environment where his mom started all her sentences with “yes.”  Even when she was going to say no.  Like, “yes, some families do go to Paris for Thanksgiving but we are not the Sarkozy’s.  We go to New Jersey.  Now get in the car.”)  As far as I’m concerned, The Boy doesn’t have to come inside at all seeing as how all he ever wants once he does come in is food and the internet.

Yet, I feel his angst because I know that these past few days have not been easy for him.  His mother (AKA: me, AKA: the driver, the yeller, the candlestick maker) in an attempt to maximize her bonus 60 minutes, tacked so many tiny extra chores onto the morning routine that we ended up leaving the house 3-5 minutes later than usual depending on whether you consulted the clock in the kitchen, the bedroom or the Master Atomic Clock at the US Naval Observatory in Washington D.C., which actually took a little while to find online so I may have lost some time proving that I was correct about the exact time (and, also, learning that there are 84 world time zones) but accuracy is important.  (Especially when I am the one who is right.  Everybody’s got time for that.  Everyone who is too young to drive themselves to school, that is.)

Before we knew it, my extra hour cost The Boy 15 minutes and the tardy count on his report card ticked ever so slightly higher (again) just because I needed to pick up wet towels off the floor or, at least, yell until the person who put the wet towels on the floor came over and picked them up.  Sue me.  Or, if you’re a Macaulay Culkin fan (and please say you’re not) emancipate yourself.  And take those stupid “Home Alone” and “Home Alone 2: Lost in New York” DVD’s with you.  (Oh Joe Pesci, what were you thinking?)

Finally, you want to discuss loss of time?  Let’s talk about Sunday when The Boy spent hours and hours fiddling around with GarageBand and then made me listen to his new song starring The Boy on guitar and vocals, featuring The Boy on drums and bass with special guest appearance by The Boy on background vocals.  And triangle.  Yes, triangle.

Sure, I gained an hour, but right there was 4.5 minutes of my life that I can never get back.

We’re Back! (PS: there is no “we.”)

3 Sep

blog image jim gaffigan

Following our busiest summer EVER (what with the book tour to Paris and all- more about that later), FA&S is pleased to announce that we’re BACK!  With even more of the sarcasm you’ve come to expect (and love).  Mostly love.

Here’s a quick run-down of what to look forward to this fall.  (Note: due to time constraints such as feeding The Boy, conversing with Spouse, disagreeing with Spouse and ultimately no longer talking to Spouse, FA&S is simply TOO BUSY FOR FULL WORDS AND SENTENCES just now.)  And yet, somehow, we have plenty of time to type in ALL CAPS.  Go figure.  Until then…F.U.

“You leave me little notes on my pillow. I told you a hundred-and-sixty-eight times I can’t .. stand .. little notes on my pillow! ‘We are all out of Corn Flakes.” -F.U.  It took me three hours to figure out that ‘F.U.’ was Felix Unger!” ~ Neil Simon’s “The Odd Couple.”

See, we don’t always abbreviate, only sumtmz.  (PS: there is no “we.”)

FYI, here’s how our summer went (also, there is no “our”):

ALB to CDG.

UTI– best place to get a UTI?  Paris, France.  30 minutes and $3 later, antibiotic drugs delivered to my apartment;  I felt like Jim Morrison without the bloat.  Ego, yes.  Bloat?  Non.

POS– as rust eats away at the tailgate of my little red car, we head south on the

GSP to

NYC

and

LBI while listening to

NPR and, of course, the sounds of The Boy whining and Spouse yelling while stepping on an imaginary brake pedal that doesn’t exist.  Why anyone would need to brake while driving on a highway is beyond me.  With so many lanes to choose from, just glide over to one that you like better.

IRS– just when I thought summer vacation was paid for, a FY2012 adjustment shows up.  (Ended up at DQ for Blizzard Therapy.)

KGB– killer ground bees.  I didn’t die but my arm swelled up like Kathleen Turner’s head on steroids.  Not a good look for her, a horrible feeling for ME.

M.E.– because that’s who was attacked by the bees and that’s who is entitled to high drama (and eggplant parm) until the swelling goes down.

W-E-D- as in “til death do us part.”  As in, the average life span of a pioneer was 40 years.  “Death” was lurking around every corner in the 1700’s.  From bad squirrel meat to well, good squirrel meat, “death” was a just part of your first marriage.  Well anyone can honor a commitment like that.  (Side note: “W-E-D” begins with a “W” and contains three letters.  As does “WHY?”  Just an observation.  You’re welcome.)

WTF– which, until recently, I thought meant “with the fries.”  I now understand why friends would often text “?” to my answers.  Like when Harry texted: “ordered burger medium-rare and it’s burnt, wtf?”  And I replied: “enjoy the f- especially steaming hot with a little vinegar and cracked pepper.”  Or when Lucy wrote:  “wtf!  At Costco and they sold out of toilet paper!”  To which I replied: “I hope they’re warm.”

Oh, and about that book tour of Paris.  Well, in June, I did visit the City of Lights where I was, again, treated to the sounds of The Boy whining and Spouse yelling (plus bread, wine and cheese.  And wine.)  Also, I read a book on the flight over.  Hence the book/tour.

The book was Jim Gaffigan’s “Dad is Fat” but I think it still counts.  Also, I figure that the only way I will ever have a book/tour of my own is by linking words like “book” and “tour” and “me” into sentences and then releasing that energy into the universe.

And I’m pretty sure that I have the “ME” part down.

Plus, I’m certain that Mr. Gaffigan appreciates the plug.

Until L8R.

Today’s Complaint(s)

23 Sep

Being married is difficult: the eternal compromising (or as I like to call it, “not getting what I want”), the battle of the thermostat, or the “cereal is not a proper dinner” argument  discussion when, really, define “proper.”   You knew that there wasn’t a whole lot about me that was proper when you married me, so why put dinner under the microscope?  Jolly Ranchers are an improper meal, cereal has fiber.  But I digress.

I can digress until the cows come home, which where I live is 6PM, but apparently when I do that, it’s nagging.  I offer the 6PM as a rough estimate; sometimes the cows are late.  They’re cows- not Amtrak.

Anyway, marriage is tough and raising a kid is work, paying taxes is well, taxing, but riding in a car with my husband- painful.  Which brings us to today’s complaint(s).

He treats parking lots like winding country roads which is odd because we live on a winding country road and his driving there is fine.  Fine, that is, if you overlook his insistence on either constantly accelerating or braking and, as a result, perpetually bearing down on the car in front of us and then stopping because we’re too close.  Then, once a safe distance between vehicles has been established, he switches back to the gas and the looming/braking/looming cycle resumes.

There’s also his refusal to use street air and, finally, the hand.  The hand with limited use- The Steering Hand.

Compared to navigating the Food King parking lot on a Saturday afternoon during a winter Nor’easter with The Steering Hand at the helm, getting stitches in your lip is a night at the opera- without the singing, Italian, horses and dying.  Really, it’s just a play.

Yes, he drove differently before being married; we both did.  I was more hurried than he and while I still tend to run late and act as if movie start times and dinner reservations are suggestions, he believes that rear view mirrors are for losers without neck muscles and relies, instead, on the reactions of others- the gasping, bracing and stomping that I provide.

And even though he has never asked for my input, isn’t it a sign of a healthy marriage to know that your spouse wants your help?  It is difficult for some men to clearly state what they need which is why when he says “stop yelling, you’ll get us killed!” I know that what he really means is “thank you, wife.  If you hadn’t screamed while I was switching lanes (without signaling), we could have gotten into some trouble back there.  What shall we do for our anniversary, my darling?”

I offer “my darling” as an example.  Your spouse may choose a different term of endearment- or at least that’s what he’ll say it is.

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